| The Very First Coffee Maker

The Very First Coffee Maker

Coffee makers are common kitchen appliances we use to brew coffee minus the trouble of boiling water separately. Many diverse styles of coffee makers use a lot of various brewing standards. The usual units use coffee grounds which are placed typically in a paper filter in a funnel which is then placed over a coffee pot made of either glass or ceramic.

For many centuries, producing a cup of coffee was a deceivingly trouble-free procedure. During the 19th and 20th centuries, it was regarded as sufficient to put in ground coffee to boiling water, leave it over the heat until the aroma’s right and transfer the concoction into a cup.

The earliest modern process of coffee making is also known as drip brewing. It is more than a century old and its blueprint changed only slightly. The Biggin which started off in France in the 1800s has two levels. It has a pot holding coffee in the compartment above where water was poured to empty into the compartment which is the coffee pot underneath. During the same period, a French creator built the pumping percolator. It is a device in which boiling water in a base chamber pushes itself up a pipe and then drips or percolates all the way through the ground coffee back in the base chamber.

The first ever espresso machine was made in France in 1882.

The instant coffee was invented by Japanese American chemist Satori Kato of Chicago in the 1900s. English chemist G.C. Washington created the first bulk-produced instant coffee in 1906. He was residing in Guatemala at the time he made the observation about dried coffee on his carafe. After experimenting, he then developed the Red E Coffee which is the name of the brand for his instant coffee.

The coffee filter paper was patented on June 20, 1908. Before the end of the same year, Mellitta and Hugo Bentz put up the Melitta Bentz Company. The following year, they sold more than a thousand coffee filters in Germany. Also, in 1937, the company patented the filter and in 1962, vacuum packing.

In the year 1938, freeze-dried coffee (Nescafe) was introduced.

Then Ernest Illy developed the first automatic espresso machine in 1933.

Later in 1946, the modern coffee maker was invented by an Italian named Achilles Gaggia. He created a high pressure machine using a spring-powered lever structure.

Even though some coffee makers tended to be standardized in unit forms, some still showed an extensive selection of design variation at the start of the 20th century. Above all, the vacuum brewer, which needed two different chambers connected in an hourglass design, motivated and inspired manufacturing designers.

Later on, coffee makers started to take on a more consistent structure matching a great rise in the level of production necessary to meet consumer demand after the war. Plastic and amalgamated supplies started to replace metal, predominantly in the 1970s. Throughout the 1990s, customers insist on more appealing machine designs to match luxurious contemporary kitchens. This resulted in a fresh trend of newly designed coffee makers which offers a greater array of existing forms and colours.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.